Current News:

Academic Calendar

Here is the Calendar of events for OLC.

  • October 2nd 2017
    • Chairs Meeting
  • October 9th 2017
    • Native American Day (Offices closed, No classes)
  • October 13th 2017
    • All Staff Meeting
  • October 20th 2017
    • Piya Wiconi Okolakiciye
  • November 3rd 2017
    • All Staff Meeeting
  • November 6th 2017
    • Chairs Meeting
  • November 10th 2017
    • Veteran's Day Holiday (Office closed, classes meet)
  • November 13th 2017
    • Registration Begins for Spring semester
  • November 17th 2017
    • Piya Wiconi Okolakiciye
  • November 23rd 2017
    • Thanksgiving Day Holiday

Omate Box Turtle

Ornate Box Turtle Ecology

  • Ornate box turtles (Terrapene ornata) are found throughout the southern and central Great Plains, reaching their northernmost extent in south-central South Dakota.  Concern over population levels of all North American box turtle species led to their 1994 listing in Appendix II of the Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) due to population concerns rangewide.  The status of ornate box turtles in South Dakota is poorly known, and the species is considered imperiled due to its rarity (G5/S2) and is recognized as one of the species of greatest conservation need by the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks. Such state and federal designations indicate urgency in establishing conservation measures for this species.  However, little is known about ornate box turtles in SD and further research linked directly to defining effective conservation programs are critically needed.  The proposed research implements an integrative conservation approach to achieve the following objectives:
    • Assist South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (SDGFP) in implementing the South Dakota Wildlife Action Plan;
    • Estimate the home range and the geographic range of ornate box turtles in South Dakota through the use of ecological niche modeling,
    • Document macro- and microhabitat use;
    • Describe movements and document daily and seasonal activity periods;
    • Estimate gene flow among local populations using a landscape genetics approach.

 

  • Student training and development:  The research helps Native American undergraduate and graduate students in several ways. 
    • It improves the research experience for Native American undergraduate students at Oglala Lakota College (OLC) by providing training in ecological field research delivering hands-on, place-based STEM instruction. 
    • It facilitates the advancement of Native American student education by bridging OLC undergraduate students interested in Conservation Biology to the Master of Science in Integrative Genomics (MSIG) at the Black Hill State University (BHSU), by providing funds for these students to enroll in an undergraduate genetics course not offered at OLC and providing funds for a Native American graduate student at BHSU to guide collaborative research efforts and offer mentoring to undergraduate researchers interested in transitioning into graduate school.
  • Collaboration: Black Hills State University (BHSU)


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