Survey of OS's - Spring 2015

* * * CAUTION - Course is currently under construction * * *

Meeting Times

Face to face sessions will meet once each week for three hours.

Course Description

You will explore the differences between popular operating systems offered in today's marketplace. Operating Systems include, but not limited to Windows and UNI/Linux.

Course Goal

Students will compare and contrast DOS, *nix (UNIX, Linux, MAC) and Windows operating systems.

Course Rationale

Information technology specialists will encounter a wide variety of operating systems. At Oglala Lakota College we make use of Windows, Linux and Macintosh computers on a user level to the servers that operate our network.

Prerequisites

None

Textbook and Course Materials

Silberschlatz, Abraham; Galvin, Peter Baer; and Gagne, Greg; Operating System Concepts Essentials, 2nd Edition, Wiley, USA, 2014, ISBN 978-1-118-8049206

Assessment of Student Learning

Activity Percent of Course Grade
Objective Evidence Papers 50%
Lab Exercises 30%
Final Test 20%

Note: Above table is not finalized

A = Superior Quality Work = Demonstrated concept mastery by scoring 90% or better.
B = Good Quality Work = Demonstrated concept mastery by scoring 80-89%.
C = Satisfactory Quality Work = Demonstrated concept mastery by scoring 70-79%.
D = Below Quality Work = Demonstrated concept mastery by scoring 60-69%.
F = Demonstrated concept mastery below the acceptable mark of < 60%.

Assessment of the IT-1533 Course - Artifacts (Homework) Collected for the Assessment Record

A copy of each assignment demonstrating accomplishment of each Student Learning Outcome will be kept by the Math Science and Technology Department as part of Assessment Record. The Assessment Record will help identify strengths and weaknesses of the course and help to improve the course each time the course is offered.

*** Highlighted Instructor Policies ***

Examination Preperation

Attend class sessions (classroom and virtual), read and engage with the weekly lesson resources. Most of the questions are taken directly from the reading material.

Collaboration:

Our policy is simple, based on professional standards: On quizzes you should not collaborate. On all other assignments you are welcome to work with anyone else on ideas and understanding however, you should complete all assignments on your own, and you should carefully acknowledge all contributions of ideas by others, whether from classmates or from sources you have read. (MITOpenCourseWare)

Cyber Infrastructure is at the same time a team sport and an individual endeavor. As individual team members become engaged and improve their knowledge and skills, the CI team will become greater. (Dudek)

Class or Assignment Cancellation

Notification of a class cancellation will be made through E-mail, and through the College Center where the class is held. However, the materials for this course are available electronically 24/7. Events such as snowstorms rarely last more than two or three days allowing students access to College Center Computer Labs each day during the week making the cancellation of class assignments unnecessary.

Incomplete or Change of Grade Policy

Students will not be given an incomplete grade or a change of a grade in this course without sound reason and documented evidence of why the course assignments could not be completed as described in the course syllabus. In any case, for a student to receive an incomplete or a change of a grade, he or she must be demonstrating passing work, must have completed a significant portion of the course and submit in writing a request for an extension to your instructor before the end of the course. The grade awarded at the end of the course will be the grade earned during the semester.

Collaboration

Our policy is simple, based on professional standards: On quizzes you should not collaborate. On all other assignments you are welcome to work with anyone else on ideas and understanding however, you should complete all assignments on your own, and you should carefully acknowledge all contributions of ideas by others, whether from classmates or from sources you have read. (MITOpenCourseWare)

Cyber Infrastructure is at the same time a team sport and an individual endeavor. As individual team members become engaged and improve their knowledge and skills, the CI team will become greater. (Dudek)

Lakota Perspective

We stress Wolakotakiciapi or “learning Lakota ways of life in the community”. We plan to conduct ourselves with the values of mutual respect and generosity (woohola na wochantognakapi), seeking to advance each individual’s knowledge through their continuing hard work (fortitude- wowalitake) and willingness to learn new information and viewpoints, as well as to demonstrate it, by speaking in front of the group (bravery-woohitike); all undertaken in an environment of complete truthfulness, trust, integrity and humility. We will do this by embracing the teaching of our ancestors as we learn new ways. (Waunspe wicakiyapi ki iglutanyan ihani unpi kun hena itan waunspe tokeca uha ayin kte.)

*** Highlighted Oglala Lakota College Policies ***

See the Current Student Handbook

To read these policies download a copy of the current Student Handbook
  • College Policy on Grading and Change of Grades, page 10
  • Attendance and Tardiness, page 7 - 8
  • Policies on Academic Honesty, see page 46
  • Standards of Conduct Policy, page 38
  • ADA Policy, page 37
  • Electronic Information Resources Acceptable Use Guidelines, page 41
  • Disclaimer, page 46

Homework:

Each student should expect to spend two (nunpa) to three (yamni) hours out of class on reading and homework assignments each week, for every hour of class time (each credit hour), in order to perform satisfactorily. Therefore, if a course is three (yamni) credit hours you should spend approximately six (sakpe) hours outside of the course room on required readings and homework. However, every student differs in their individual skills, educational background, experience, capability and personal goals; so the amount of time you must dedicate to out of class work can vary significantly from this national average.

Lakota Perspective:

We stress Wolakotakiciapi or “learning Lakota ways of life in the community”. We plan to conduct ourselves with the values of mutual respect and generosity (woohola na wochantognakapi), seeking to advance each individual’s knowledge through their continuing hard work (fortitude- wowalitake) and willingness to learn new information and viewpoints, as well as to demonstrate it, by speaking in front of the group (bravery-woohitike); all undertaken in an environment of complete truthfulness, trust, integrity and humility. We will do this by embracing the teaching of our ancestors as we learn new ways. (Waunspe wicakiyapi ki iglutanyan ihani unpi kun hena itan waunspe tokeca uha ayin kte.)

End of the Semester Course Evaluation

At the end of the course, students will receive an automated email invitation to submit an on-line evaluation of the course and instruction provided. All submitted course evaluations are confidential, and only aggregate data and comments will be shared with the instructor and program director. Your thoughts are vitally important to Oglala Lakota College in our efforts continuously to improve our programs.

Disclaimer

Oglala Lakota College makes no warranties of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for the network facilities it is providing. Oglala Lakota College will not be responsible for any damages suffered by its users. This includes loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, or service interruptions caused by its own negligence or user errors or omissions. Oglala Lakota College is not responsible for phone/credit card bills or any other charges incurred by users. Use of any information obtained via the network is at the user’s own risk. Oglala Lakota College specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its network facilities.